USPSTF recommendations negatively impact yearly mammograms among 40-49 year old women

March 16, 2016

In the study at the University Hospitals at Case Medical Center, out of the 524 biopsies performed, 108 cases of cancer were diagnosed. Cancers found in the 40-49-year-old patients who underwent screening mammography presented at a much earlier stage of breast cancer than those patients who did not have screening mammograms. Dr. Plecha believes that if primary physicians and patients begin following the USPSTF's guidelines, survival rates in this population will decline. She says "Seventy percent of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer don't have a family history of breast cancer. It's very important that we continue to do all that we can to catch breast cancer in the earliest stages so that we can continue to save lives."

Dr. Hardesty also stresses the importance of emphasizing the benefits of yearly mammograms to 40-49 year old patients and physicians alike. She says, "We must continue to get the message out to our patients and make sure that referring providers understand our recommendations because they are the ones who are influencing patients in that age group."

Dr. Hardesty and Dr. Plecha will deliver presentations on their studies on Monday, May 2, 2011 at the 2011 ARRS Annual Meeting at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.

Source: American Roentgen Ray Society