Researchers awarded funds to assess effects of omega-3 fatty acids on breast cancer development

September 08, 2015

Georgel added that the team's work also highlights the importance of studies of epigenetic events, or events that alter the activity of genes without changing their sequence.

"The generation of disease-specific epigenome maps will provide complementary and crucial information to the already well-established genome map," he said.

Hardman also said the grants will serve as a good foundation for the new Marshall University Nutrition and Cancer Center, which will support multiple researchers.

Dr. John Maher, vice president for research and executive director of the Marshall University Research Corporation, congratulated Hardman and Georgel, adding that these newest grants help build on the university's growing reputation for its outstanding biomedical research programs.

Maher said, "The fact that Dr. Hardman and Dr. Georgel's work was selected for funding by the Department of Defense from more than 100 proposals is further proof that Marshall's faculty and cancer research programs are top-notch. Their studies will lead to better prevention and treatment options for some of the most pressing health concerns of our time."

Hardman said once these studies are complete, she and Georgel may turn their attention to exploring whether or not diet changes later in life will also reduce cancer risk by the same or different mechanisms.

Source: Marshall University Research Corporation