Removing unruptured AVM decreases risk of hemorrhaging, provides better outcomes to patients

March 07, 2016

Past research has suggested that the annual risk of hemorrhaging in the brain from unruptured AVMs may be as low as one percent per year especially among those for whom intervention appears feasible. But large and more complex AVMs have higher hemorrhage rates and pose greater technical challenges for intervention, and as a result treatment is deferred for many due to the risks. Age, deep brain location, associated aneurysms, and deep venous drainage add to hemorrhage risk factors.

"We hope that this study will provide high-quality, scientific evidence to guide the often times difficult decision on whether one ought to have preventative treatment," said Chen. "Currently, this decision is largely determined by anecdotal experiences, biases, hopes and fears."

Patients enrolled in the study will be randomly assigned to one of two groups - those who will undergo an AVM elimination and those who will only be managed medically. Study participants will be followed for 5-8 years.

The ARUBA study has enrolled over 120 patients and plants to enroll 800 patients from 100 different institutions worldwide. Rush is one of only two Chicago area medical centers participating in the study.

Source: Rush University Medical Center