AACR forum to focus on new advancements in cancer management among women

November 01, 2015

The researchers also peered into the workings of IPF by transplanting the disease from humans into mice. Those experiments showed a greater fibrotic response to the TLR9-activating DNA using lung cells from patients with rapidly progressing IPF than with cells from people with slowly progressing IPF.

For more than two decades, the National Institutes of Health has funded the U-M group's investigation into the biological basis of IPF as well as novel ways to diagnose and treat patients who suffer from the devastating disorder. U-M's scientists and doctors study human cells to better understand how they are involved in the progressive scarring of the lungs. In addition, clinical testing is used to help better predict the stage of disease and the rate of progression in advising patients for therapy.

"The approach taken by our group really highlights the advantages of translational research in a complex human disease and shows the bench-to-bedside model is really a two-way street," notes Cory M. Hogaboam, Ph.D., a professor of pathology at U-M and the study's other senior investigator.

SOURCE University of Michigan